Time to Do It Over

Why is there never time enough to do something,
and yet always time enough to do it over?

When I was in graduate school, I worked in a lab and there was a TREMENDOUS sign on the wall with the phrase, “Why is there never enough time to do something right the first time, and yet always enough time to do it over?” Wow! That was heavy. I had to admit that someone was onto something I had never thought of before.

I couldn’t understand it, but it certainly was true. There never was enough time to do anything, and yet always time to do it over. As a science student, I wanted to think this was a revelation from somebody in a physics class about a new space-time continuum, but the more I studied the phrase the more I realized that no, this was just a common fact of life. Many times I don’t allow enough time to do and job, rush through it because of a time crunch, mess it up and then, surprise, surprise, have to spend time doing it over. And, if you have experienced this, you know there is always time to do a job over. So why not do the job deliberately, intentionally, while being totally focused on the job’s successful completion in the first place?

Not being distracted, living in the moment and living with intention are things that I have been working on for quite a while. For almost thirty years, in fact, since the middle 1980s. I first learned to verbalize the concept with gifted counselors and life coaches in the Boston, MA area. When the time comes, I’ll introduce you to them. But until then, this book will explain it all better than I can and give you some insights:

To live your life with intention, or at least preview the book about doing so, determinely hover your mouse over this link: Life Is a Verb: 37 Days to Wake Up, Be Mindful, and Live Intentionally

One of the Amazon reviewers had some great thoughts I thought I would share: “In short, as I read on, I found myself getting sharper and smarter. I considered why it might be better to make a mistake — and learn from it — than strain to get everything right. And I read the obituary Patti Digh wrote recently for her father — who died in 1980, when she was in her teens — and misted over.

The stories in the news these days are so big. Tectonic plates are moving. History is being made. But then, it always is. “Life is a Verb” is a reminder that our lives are bigger than the stories in the headlines. A small thought? Not to me. Now I have to go back to the beginning and start again….”


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