The Wampanoag of Massachusetts

Wampanoag women watch the cooking fire while sharing their culture.

When we visited Plimoth Plantation, I was fascinated by the Wampanoag (Wam-pa-nog) tribe members who were interpreters in the Wampanoag Native American homesite area. These interpreters went beyond being reenactors as they were actually present day Wampanoag tribe members recreating the cultural life of their ancestors. It was very interesting to listen to the two ladies at the cooking fire and also to hear their conversation with each other. They were enjoying life, cutting up and pleasantly giggling with us as they prepared food and answered our questions. We enjoyed meeting them.

The green area shows the original location of the Wampanoag.

A little over 2,000 Wampanoag survive, and many live on the Watuppa Wampanoag Reservation on Martha’s Vineyard. In addition, there is land which is owned separately by families and in common by Wampanoag descendants at both Chapaquddick and Christiantown. Some additional Wampanoag tribal members live in Bermuda. They are descendants of those sold overseas by the Puritans during the aftermath of King Philip’s War in 1675-1676.

This information and the nice map are from a Wikipedia entry that you can find here. If you want a detailed report, there is a very interesting Native American history web site that documents Wampanoag history as one of its listings: go to this link.

In the following video, you can take a tour of the Wampanoag homesite at Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts. By the way, if you are interested in planting the three sisters of corn, beans and squash in a Wampanoag Garden, directions found here, you can see Wampanoag companion plantings in the video at 7:08 minutes or so.

Tour the Wampanoag Homesite at Plimoth Plantation.
Spoiler Alert! Wampanoag Garden shown at 7:08 minutes!

This is a good book for children in the primary grades. I especially enjoyed the photographs. If you would like to preview it, hover your mouse over this link: The Wampanoags (True Books, American Indians)


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