Sea Otters are Loving Animals

Sea Otters float on their backs and crack open clams on their tummies to get their dinners.

Sea Otters live on the Pacific Coast of the United States and along the Pacific Coasts of Russia and China. A German scientist named Georg Wilhelm Steller lived in the early 1700′s and was a biologist, meaning he studied both animals and plants. He wrote the first description of the Sea Otter in his field notebooks of 1751.

Sea Otters are furry animals that are awake for most of their activities during the day and sleep at night just like most people do. Sometimes if a mother Sea Otter has babies to feed she will get up at night to find food to feed them, but usually Sea Otters are active during the day.

Being long and skinny, Sea Otters are shaped sort of like ferrets, but they have webbed feet for swimming, in fact, if they had to, a Sea Otter could spend their whole lives in water, never going on land.

Sea Otters are very social, loving little creatures. They enjoy spending time together and even like to float around in the water holding hands so they can stay close to each other.

To learn more about Sea Otters, go here.

 

To keep from drifting apart, sea otters may sleep holding paws.

To watch a video with Sea Otters holding paws click the play button below:


 

Sea Otters are found on the Pacific Ocean coasts of Asia and North America.

 

Sunbonnet Smart has a Sea Otter Page for you to color!

The Monterey Bay aquarium has a Sea Otter Can where you can watch Sea Otters playing and having fun.  This is what their web page says:

Meet our otters!

You’ll often see our otters on the move in this exhibit. Our aquarists put food in toys to stimulate the otters’ natural behavior of pounding and working to get food out of shells. They also teach the otters behaviors, like holding a target with their paws, or walking onto a scale or into a kennel. Training keeps our otters mentally and physically stimulated; it also makes working with the otters safer for us and less stressful for them. To enjoy the Sea Otter Cam go here.

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