Irish Real Milk

The Irish drinking real milk is Sunbonnet Smart.

I enjoy receiving the newsletter from W. C. Douglass, M.D. called “Daily Dose.” As you might expect, it arrives daily in my e-mail box and it always has something of interest. This morning, I was intrigued by a lead article called Ireland Readies Raw Milk Ban. Here it is so you can see what you think about it:

New rules will turn milk lovers into outlaws
by W.C. Douglass, M.D.

Ireland’s famous fresh dairy products are about to go sour: After years of allowing unregulated raw milk sales, the government is getting ready to cut it all off practically overnight.

The total ban on raw milk sales might even be taking effect as you read this.

What’s amazing here isn’t just the 180-degree turn on raw milk from complete freedom to a complete ban — it’s the fact that Ireland is actually living, breathing PROOF that raw milk is safe and healthy.

Since the last ban was lifted in 2006, the Irish have turned to farm-fresh milk with the gusto they normally reserve for Guinness. One farmer told the Irish Times this summer that he went from selling no raw milk at all to 400 liters a week in no time flat.

Yet despite the growing raw milk consumption, there have been no major outbreaks of illness or disease.

And that’s not just the luck o’ the Irish at work — it’s because responsibly produced raw milk is not the risky cocktail you’ve been led to believe. In fact, bans like this one aren’t about safety at all — and they never are.

All countries with raw milk restrictions and bans — including the United States — have one thing in common, and it’s not healthier people: It’s a powerful dairy industry. Pasteurization is the hammer that industry uses to nail down control of everyone’s milk money.

Without pasteurization laws, farmers can sell direct to consumers and earn a good living. With those laws in place, however, most farmers have no choice but to sell their milk to Big Dairy operations for pennies on the dollar.

Farmers aren’t the only ones getting the shaft here — consumers also lose big, because pasteurization kills everything in milk worth having: powerful natural probiotics and healthy dairy proteins as well as key vitamins and minerals.

Those nutrients make raw milk an immune-boosting tonic that can beat allergies and asthma, fight illness and disease, and even cure autism in children.

To my Irish readers — and everyone else who has to fight for the right to drink raw milk — don’t let the authorities push you around. Get your raw milk however you can.

Irish shamrocks and fresh raw milk grow at
Your Family Cow in Chambersburg, PA

As Dr. Douglass indicates in his article above, there are restrictions against of selling unpasteurized, non-homogenized milk in the United States. This is true. Some states freely allow raw milk sales, while others totally ban the sale, while the states in between restrict the sale in some way. Sale of raw milk went relatively unnoticed for years.  As the public has realized the health benefits of drinking real milk, however, the commercialized high throughput product has suffered in sales and profit. Now, in some states, raw milk drinkers have to fight for the right to choose their milk product. And so, we are working hard for the freedom to choose just like they are fighting in Ireland now.

The milking barn at Your Family Cow, Chambersburg, PA.

In Ireland, there are many united groups of raw milk drinkers, just as there are here in the United States. The Irish groups’ missions mirror our own groups when they say, The Irish government intends to ban the sale of raw milk before the end of 2011. We want the right to choose and are calling for the government to introduce fair regulations rather than an outright ban…We believe that everyone has a right to drink one of Irelands best products; milk – in its pure unadulterated creamy and delicious form – raw milk. The choice is the key point here… Informed consumers should have the right to decide for themselves what they eat and drink.”

If you are interested in the Irish groups joining together to promote the drinking of healthy raw milk, then click on this link.  There are some remarkable discussions on the sale of raw milk planned for November 1, 2011 in the United States as well. To see an update on mothers bringing in raw milk from Pennsylvania and drinking in front of the FDA in Silver Spring, Maryland, click on this: “Will Tuesday’s ‘milk and cookies’ rally at the FDA be the ‘Woodstock’ of the Food Rights Movement?”

Ireland has world renown dairy products, many of which are
used to cook in this book. If you have an interest in
previewing The New Irish Table, hover your mouse over this link:

The New Irish Table: 70 Contemporary Recipes


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